Types and Causes of Hearing Loss and Ways to Prevent It

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Hearing Loss
Hearing Loss

It  is a common condition among humans. By the age of 60, about half of all people are expected to experience hearing loss. As we get older, the degree of hearing loss increases too. Various factors can cause it, but some underlying causes lead to hearing loss over time. It is important to understand its types and how they occur to prevent or reduce the risk of developing ear listening power loss later in life consult a speech and hearing clinic in Bangalore. This article highlights some of the common types and causes as well as potential ways you can prevent or even reverse them.

Normal Hearing and Hearing Loss Types

Hearing loss varies dramatically from person to person. The types of loss, however, are quite similar. Here are some of the most common types: – Sensorineural hearing loss is the most common type of hearing loss and affects the outer two-thirds of your hearing nerve. The inner nerve lets signals through, so you experience hearing but not sound. – Conductive hearing loss: This type of hearing loss happens when your hearing nerve becomes damaged and cannot transmit sound signals. The hearing loss is complete, but the person still hears the sound. – Mixed hearing loss: This occurs when one or both types of hearing loss occur at the same time. A mixed type of hearing loss is more likely to occur in younger people and can interfere with learning.

Sensorineural 

Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when the hearing nerve is damaged. The nerve still manages to transmit signals to the brain, but the brain does not receive the sounds. Hearing aids and hearing tests help find sensorineural hearing loss. The cause of sensorineural hearing loss is usually unknown. It can occur for many reasons, including – Age-related factors: As we age, our hearing ability is affected by a decrease in the auditory nerve fibers. This is a normal part of the aging process. – Certain diseases: Certain conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol can cause hearing loss. Other diseases such as syphilis, AIDS, and meningitis can cause hearing loss.

Conductive 

Conductive hearing loss is caused by damage to the bones, muscles, or fluid that transmit sound vibrations to the inner ear. The loss of hearing due to conductive hearing occurs when there is damage to the inner ear’s sound-receiving part. A conductive hearing loss can occur for many reasons, including: – Aging: As we age, the bones and muscles that transmit sound begin to weaken. This causes hearing loss. – Certain diseases: Certain conditions such as chronic ear infections, certain tumors, and vitamin B12 deficiency can cause conductive hearing loss. – Congenital factors: Children may experience conductive hearing loss due to a congenital disability or abnormality in the ear.

Mixed 

Mixed hearing loss is the combination of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. A mixed hearing loss occurs when a person’s hearing is damaged, and there is damage to the bones and muscles that transmit sound to the inner ear. A person with a mixed hearing loss can still hear sound but can’t understand what is being said. Hearing aids and a hearing test help detect mixed hearing loss.

Sensorineural and Causes

Hearing loss can be classified into several types, but sensorineural hearing loss is the most common. It occurs when the outer two-thirds of your hearing nerve is damaged. This damage prevents the transmission of sound signals to the brain. Sensorineural hearing loss can occur for many reasons, including – Age-related factors: As we age, the auditory nerve fibers that transmit sound weakens. This is a natural part of the aging process. – Certain diseases: Certain conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol can cause sensorineural hearing loss. Other diseases such as syphilis, and meningitis can cause hearing loss.

Conductive and Causes

Conductive hearing loss is caused by damage to the bones, muscles, or fluid that transmit sound vibrations to the inner ear. A conductive hearing loss occurs when damage to the inner ear’s sound-receiving part. Conductive hearing loss can occur for many reasons, including: – Aging: As we age, the bones and muscles that transmit sound begin to weaken. This causes hearing loss. – Certain diseases: Certain conditions such as chronic ear infections, certain tumors, and vitamin B12 deficiency can cause conductive hearing loss. – Congenital factors: Children may experience conductive hearing loss due to a congenital disability or abnormality in the ear.

Prevention of Hearing Loss

Hearing loss is a condition that can be prevented by taking care of your hearing. Practice safe habits, such as not using earbuds or headphones excessively, not exposing yourself to loud sounds as a child, and using hearing protection when working with noisy machines. Also, eating a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains will help keep your body in good health and prevent hearing loss. Finally, talking to your healthcare provider about protecting your hearing when you are older is another important step.

Conclusion

Hearing loss occurs when the auditory nerve is damaged. This prevents the brain from receiving sound signals. Hearing loss can be caused by factors such as age, genetics, or a disease. Preventing hearing loss is important because hearing loss is difficult to fix, making it difficult to hear in noisy places, such as restaurants or concerts. We hope this article has helped you understand the types and causes of hearing loss and how you can prevent it. If you have been diagnosed with hearing loss, don’t worry. There are many ways to improve your quality of life and make it easier to hear.

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